Family Home of John Paul II

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Booking hours:
9.00am-13.00pm
Monday- Friday
Reservations are accepted up to 3 months in advance of your arrival date

+48 33 823 35 65

 

+48 33 823 26 62

 

 

Our invitation

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There are places that we are happy to return to. The return is not only joyful; it can also be a duty, a consequence of the fact that we belong to a community; that community may be a family, a nation, a community of believers, or a community with universally shared values. The family home of John Paul II in Wadowice is one of those places that we are both happy and duty bound to return to. Here, at number 7 Kościelna Street, is the house where Karol, nicknamed Lolek by his friends and family, was born at 17.00 on 18 May 1920. Their third child, he was named after his father by his parents Emilia née Kaczorowska  and Karol Wojtyła. Many years later, Pope John Paul II looked back on his youth and recalled … here it all started, in this town, in Wadowice. My life started and school, and university and theatre. And my priesthood also started here.

The John Paul II Family Home Museum in Wadowice is a magical and unique record of the life of John Paul II and the contribution that his papacy gave to the world. The initial concept for the museum came Wadowice Town Council, and the Archdiocese of Kracow for enabling this challenging undertaking to succeed. The atmosphere of the family home and the life of Saint John Paul II has been captured perfectly as a result of the work of Barbara and Jarosław Kłaput, the designers and creators of the permanent exhibition. As a result of their talent and innovative use of modern multimedia, visitors – young and old, who met Karol Wojtyła in Wadowice – can explore every stage of his life. It is a story about an ordinary man, a man who attained his sainthood by working diligently, by faithfully following divine law and by believing in the great love of God and man. Emotions ranging from joy and fascination with the life of an exceptional individual to admiration for the grandeur of his spirit and mind are tempered by the tragic moments of his pontificate and the sadness of his final days as he was approaching the house of the Father. However, thanks to the Museum, we can also rediscover the genius of Karol, the man who became Pope.

As a consequence of the universal values from the Rev. Prelate Edward Zacher, a former religious instructor to the young Karol. On 18 May 1984, with the encouragement and support of Cardinal Franciszek Macharski, the Museum was formally opened in what had once been the Wojtyłas’ first floor flat. It was always run by the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. Some years later, following a proposed extension of the museum, the entire building was purchased with this purpose in mind. The Ryszard Krauze Foundation raised the necessary funds for this and presented them to the Archdiocese of Kracow, represented by Cardinal Stanisław Dziwisz. The Cardinal, who had for many years closely cooperated with John Paul II, donated numerous objects relating to their friendship to the Museum, for which we are extremely grateful. \

We also wish to extend our gratitude to all those who have supported the Museum with their gifts, memorabilia and their invaluable advice and kindness. We would further like to also express our gratitude to the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage, the Małopolska Voivodeship, promoted by John Paul II, a visit to our Museum has a multidimensional character; by keeping memories of him alive and by promoting a greater understanding of the man, to whom Poland and the world owes so much, we hope to pass on the spirit and the values of John Paul II to successive
generations.

Let us follow this path together. May this book guide us through his home which has become a home to us all. Let the pilgrim’s passion of the great Saint of Wadowice inspire us and be our beacon on the paths that lie before us. May all those who enter the Museum instantly feel as though they themselves have finally returned home.